Kathua Attacks: Slain Militants Carried Pak-made Medicines

Kathua Attacks: Slain Militants Carried Pak-made Medicines

31 March 2014
The Tribune (Chandigarh)
Ravi Krishnan Khajuria

Jammu: The three terrorists, who were eliminated in a day-long gunfight in the jungles of Janglote on March 28, were also carrying Pakistan-made medicines that could check bleeding by quickly forming fibrin over wounds. They also carried Pakistan-made ointments whose strong odour could keep venomous insects, including reptiles, away. 'Seizure of heavy arms, ammunition and Pakistan-made medicines from Janglote amply indicate direction of their route of infiltration and their origin,' said a top police source. The medicines, which were manufactured in Karachi and Lahore, included tablets, painkiller injections, syringes, cotton, bandages and ointments that could check and cure internal and external bleeding, headache and repel venomous insects, he added. However, the two mobile phones that were seized from the slain ultras and had SIM cards of two private Indian cellular companies belonged to the occupants of Mahindra Bolero, the first target of the terrorists on the fateful morning. Both the cellphones belonged to the occupants of the Bolero and had local SIM cards. The ultras had snatched them from the victims, said the source. 'The global positioning system (GPS), which was among the recoveries, was damaged but we are trying to retrieve the data,' he said. Arms and ammunition recovered from the site of encounter at Janglote included three pre-prepared IEDs, one UBGL, three AK-47 assault rifles, 27 AK magazines, six pistol magazines, 425 AK rounds, 73 rounds of 9 mm pistol, two rounds of UBGL, 14 hand grenades, one global positioning system, two mobile phones (Samsung and Nokia) and one knife (Machete). Only batteries had to be attached to the three powerful IEDs and then they could have easily caused a big damage, said an Army officer. Despite nearly 12-hour gunbattle, the recoveries amply indicated that the ultras had dangerous machinations, he added. Al-Shuhada Brigade, an offshoot of the Lashkar-e-Toiba, had claimed the responsibility for the twin attacks that had left two civilians and a soldier dead. Terror trail * Seizure of heavy arms, ammunition and Pakistan-made medicines from Janglote amply indicate direction of the militants' route of infiltration and their origin. * The medicines were manufactured in Karachi and Lahore. The medical kit included tablets, painkiller injections, syringes, cotton, bandages and ointments that could check and cure internal and external bleedings, headache and repel venomous insects.