India, Pak Broadly Discuss Some Territorial Concessions On Kashmir: Shaharyar Khan

India, Pak Broadly Discuss Some Territorial Concessions On Kashmir: Shaharyar Khan

6 January 2014
India Today
Javed Ansari

New Delhi: A day after Arun Jaitley, the Leader of Opposition in the Rajya Sabha, challenged Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to make public the contents of the deal that India and Pakistan came close to inking on the Kashmir issue, Headlines Today can reveal the broad contours of the agreement. According to Shaharyar Khan, special envoy appointed by Nawaz Sharif to improve relations with India, the issue was close to a resolution on two occasions, once during Atal Bihari Vajpayee's time and later during the Manmohan Singh's government. However, it was only during the discussion between Atal Bihari Vajpayee and General Musharraf, who was then president of Pakistan, that question of territorial concessions came up. 'It did entail a barter of territory by both sides. It was known as the Chenab formula. According to it, Chenab would have been considered the border dividing the two countries. Srinagar would have remained with India, a small part of the territory West of Chenab would have come to us and similarly some of the territory with us would have gone to India, however it never came to fruitarians and nobody is now willing to acknowledge it,' says Shaharyar Khan. In an exclusive interview to Headlines Today, Khan said that India still has concerns on the issue, and we want to address and act on this. 'I am not in a position to put a time frame to it, but it should happen soon,' he said. He is hopeful of the issue being resolved in the future. 'From what I've read in the media, it entailed four broad parameters. In Kashmir loose borders, a joint mechanism comprising of both sides would look after things, demilitarisation and of course, local trade,' he said. Khan is on a private visit to India in connection with the launch of his latest book 'The Cauldron of Cricket', also revealed that stage was being prepared for India and Pakistan to resume cricket ties. 'We are perfectly willing to play in India, and the only window available is in September-October. Our board president has been in touch with his Indian counterpart, and if all goes well we will play each other soon,' he said. Khan revealed that his country had toyed with the idea of playing India in South Africa, and England. 'But the economics don't work hence we are perfectly happy to come here and play a full five-match series soon,' said Khan. Significantly, the Pakistan Prime Minister's special envoy also held out the promise of some action against those responsible for the terror attacks in Mumbai. 'I can assure India that there will be movement on its concerns on Mumbai (terror attacks), (26-11 accused Hafiz) Saeed, etc. You'll see it will happen soon,' he said.