UP Government Objects To Deployment Of Jammu And Kashmir Police

UP Government Objects To Deployment Of Jammu And Kashmir Police

3 April 2013
India Today
Naseer Ganai

Srinagar: In a major setback to Omar Abdullah government's initiative to rehabilitate former militants, the Uttar Pradesh government has raised objections to deploying of Jammu and Kashmir police along its border with Nepal to facilitate return of former militants from Pakistan through Nepal route. 'The UP government has raised objections. We are looking into it and we will see how it can be sorted out,' Minister of State for Home, Sajjad Kichloo told reporters outside the State Assembly in Jammu on Wednesday. According to the officials following Delhi police's controversial arrest of Liyaqat Ali Shah last month, the Ministry of Home had decided to legalise the return of Kashmiri militants through the Nepal route and had agreed for deployment of J&K police to facilitate the return. Under the new plan J&K police had to assist Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) along Indo-Nepal border to facilitate return of the Kashmiri militants. 'We had gone two steps ahead to ensure safe return of these youth via Nepal. But UP has raised objections,' Kichloo said. Since 2010 at least 241 former militants have returned, some along with their families including wife and children, after the rehabilitation policy was announced while 3974 Kashmiri youth are still living in Pakistani Kashmir. 'The policy is not the creation of the state government alone but has backing of the Union Ministry of Home Affairs,' Kichloo said. The State Government adopted rehabilitation policy in January, 2010 and made applicable for militants, who had crossed over PoK. According to the policy, approved by the State Government after approval of the Union Home Ministry, former militants should return from four entry points - Poonch-Rawalakote, Uri-Muzafferbad, Wagah (Punjab) and Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi. However, PoK returnees chose Nepal route. 'There seems to be an understanding between New Delhi and Islamabad on Nepal route. There is Pakistan's tactical support to the rehabilitation policy but Islamabad doesn't want to get directly involved in it. So they are doing it through third party, which is Nepal in present case,' a police officer said pleading anonymity. Officials say they are asked to take Nepal route deliberately as under the protocol signed between India and Nepal an Indian citizen can travel to Nepal and return when he establishes his Indian nationality.