Kashmiri Youth Throng BSF Centre For Jobs

Kashmiri Youth Throng BSF Centre For Jobs

25 February 2013
Rising Kashmir


Srinagar: Braving morning chill, intermittent strikes and curfew, scores of Kashmiri youth have been thronging the Subsidiary Training Centre (STC) of Border Security Force (BSF) at Humhama for the last one week. As part of country wide recruitment, Staff Selection Committee has shortlisted candidates for their entry into para-military forces such as BSF, Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) and Indo Tibetian Border Police (ITBP). A few hundred candidates have been shortlisted from Valley and have been reporting the BSF centre for physical tests. “It is part of the process the SSC goes through while making the recruitment. There is huge rush of candidates from different parts of Kashmir,” said an official. He said, “we do not have any role here and the process is being supervised by SSC”. With matriculation as basic qualification there are scores of candidates who have higher qualifications. But the significant thing is that joining the para military forces such as BSF, CRPF and ITBP are no longer a taboo in Kashmir as the number of educated unemployed youth is going up. “I came from Kokernag and booked a Sumo to reach in time,” said Javed Ahmed. He had reached Humhama by 7 AM and had been waiting for about 40 minutes. He was joined by two others from the same area. “I am a graduate and I could not find job anywhere and had no option but to apply for this,” said a youth who wished not to be named. “This job is difficult but where should I go” he asked. He is also comfortable with the good salary package and believes that he can support his father’s large family. A constable who is recruited in either of the forces will get a package of around Rs 20,000 per month. Mohammad Sultan a young man from Kupwara has passed his 12th class examination and too had reached early morning. “I did not want to take a risk and joined a group of youth who were coming here in a Sumo,” he said. His story is no different from the youth who had come from South Kashmir. Why joining the para-military forces is not a taboo or why there is not much risk involved?. The reply is sharp. Where should we go?. “We know that it is risky but we have no option. At least this can ensure a descent and honourable living,” said Nazeer Hussain. A young man Mudasir Ahmad from Downtown Srinagar was also in que to look for the job. “I have exhausted all the options of finding a job in state government. But could not succeed. I have three sisters and my father is a labourer,” he said. Though there is no assurance for the candidates who appear for physical tests as they have go through written test as well but they are hoping that a good chunk of youth from Kashmir will be selected. There are more than 5,000 youth from the state in para military forces. In the past few years special recruitment drives were conducted by the government of India to give jobs to them. “Our Kashmiri boys are defending borders in North Eastern states, West Bengal and Rajasthan. They are committed people and we are proud of them,” said a top BSF official.