People Took To Streets For Genuine Demands, Cause In 2010: Beg

People Took To Streets For Genuine Demands, Cause In 2010: Beg

20 January 2013
Rising Kashmir
Nasrun Mir

Srinagar: Member Parliament and senior National Conference leader, Mehboob Beg Sunday said the government should revisit its policy against people who were arrested under Public Safety Act during 2010 summer protests. “We have made mistakes in past and we have to revisit the arrests made under PSA including those students who were booked for participating in 2010 protests,” Beg told Rising Kashmir at National Conference headquarters after Nasir Aslam Wani assumed formal charge as provisional president (Kashmir) of NC. “We had a peaceful 2011and 2012 and it was because of people who wished for peace. We have to look how we can give them the peace dividends.” Beg said he objected to the views presented in the parliament in 2010 when many speakers alleged that street protests in Kashmir were sponsored and that youth were paid as daily wagers by separatists. “I said in parliament ‘which mother in world will accept a dead body of her son for Rs 500. People who are fighting on streets of Kashmir have genuine demands and they are fighting for a cause,” said Beg as he referred to his speech made in 2010 in the parliament. He said constitution of Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) as suggested by Chief Minister Omar Abdullah, is must to bring justice to families of people whose children have disappeared or were subjected to enforced disappearances. “We always speak of giving justice to the families of those children who went missing and people who are buried in unmarked graves. I believe that setting up of Truth and Reconciliation Commission just like South Africa did after the end of apartheid is the way forward to help families of the victims.” Beg also criticized Indian government for “protecting” armed forces accused of mass rapes in Kashmir. “To be selective about a human tragedy is the most painful thing. Rape is a rape. You cannot use so-called national interest prism to protect army. If security forces did it, you cannot be selective and save them with laws like Armed Forces Special Powers Act.” He said making distinction between victims breed alienation and will never serve the national interest. “In democracy nothing is more painful and shameful than being selective in empathizing the pain of a victim. How can you separate rape victims? Kashmir feels the pain of the Delhi rape victim and we don’t see what religion or caste the victim belonged.”