For Every 4 Militants, A Jawan Loses Life In Jammu & Kashmir

For Every 4 Militants, A Jawan Loses Life In Jammu & Kashmir

19 September 2012
The Hindustan Times
Ashiq Hussain

Srinagar: For every four militants killed in Jammu and Kashmir since militancy erupted in 1989, a security jawan and three civilians became victims of the bloody violence. Official data furnished by the union ministry of home affairs to an RTI activist, a copy of which is with the Hindustan Times, reveals that 40,127 people - militants, civilians and security personnel - were killed in 22 years of violence in the state, accounting for five deaths daily from 1990 to July 31, 2012. In about 70,000 incidents of militancy-related incidents, 21,461 militants were killed, followed by 13,853 civilian killings. As many as 4,813 security personnel -army, police, CRPF and BSF -were killed by militants during the period. However human rights groups and separatists put the toll of killings in between 70,000 and 100,000 with claims of 8,000 disappearances. The data indicated that the bloodiest years of militancy in the Kashmir Valley were not in 1990s but immediately after the end of Kargil war in 1999. The years, 2001 and 2002, were among the deadliest of the 22-year-old insurgency with at least 3,552 and 3,168 total deaths, respectively. As many as 2,020 militants were killed in 2001, the highest-ever number with 536 security forces losing their lives in the same year. The highest figure of civilian deaths falls in 2002 at 1,008. As against 3,000 incidents of violence on an average in late 1990s, the two years (2001, 2002) witnessed 4,522 and 4,038 incidents, respectively. The figures show a decline after 2003, the year when India and Pakistan agreed to a ceasefire on Line of Control dividing the two parts of Kashmir, followed by a peace process next year. In 2004, the number of deaths of civilians, militants and security forces came down to 1964 from 2,603 cases the previous year. Continuing to fall gradually, the number of casualties in 2011 reached a low of 161.