Imran Blames India, Pak Leaders For Failing To Resolve Kashmir

Imran Blames India, Pak Leaders For Failing To Resolve Kashmir

30 January 2012
Greater Kashmir


Kolkata: Cricketer-turned politician Imran Khan today held the present leadership of both India and Pakistan responsible for not being able to resolve the Kashmir issue. 'The Kashmir issue can't be solved unilaterally and I am hopeful that the present generation will change things,' Imran Khan, founder-president of Tehreek-e-Insaf political party in Pakistan, said at the Kolkata Literary Meet of the Kolkata Book Fair, here. Khan suggested that leaders of both India and Pakistan to sit across the negotiation table to resolve the Kashmir issue. 'We are carrying a huge baggage of history. There is no leader who can take the risk for the future, neither in Pakistan nor in India.' 'The issue (Kashmir) needs to be resolved in a civilised way. The dividend of peace is enormous. Although it has not happened yet, I am hopeful that the issue will be resolved eventually,' he said. Imran said, 'It will happen because the new generation does not have any baggage of history. This is the time to lead and mould public opinion. The leaders should not follow public sentiments, but they should lead.' Evading a query on what his party would like to do on improving the Indo-Pak relationship, Khan said that people of both countries should understand that friendship would benefit both of them. 'People of both Pakistan and India want friendship. But it is the leadership which creates problems. But I am hopeful the new generation in both the countries will change things,' he said. Khan described the present regime in Islamabad as the most corrupt and incompetent in the history of the country, but said his party would not like any military intervention. 'This is the most corrupt and incompetent government in the history in Pakistan, but still our party does not favour any military government in the country,' Khan said. Khan said, 'No matter how bad our democracy is, but we don't want a military takeover in Pakistan.' He said that the citizens were as concerned about Pakistan as the Pakistan Army. 'If the country goes bankrupt, then the Army will suffer,' he said.