Hurriyat Attacks US Journalism For Diplomats’ Kashmir Remarks

Hurriyat Attacks US Journalism For Diplomats’ Kashmir Remarks

8 September 2011
Kashmir Observer


Srinagar: The Hurriyat (M) on Wednesday flayed US journalism for “arrogance and conceit” on the recent WikiLeaks disclosures about Kashmir politics, but refrained from clear comment on the “rivers of money” allegations made in the diplomatic cables released by the whistle-blowing website. The only political formation here to react so far to the cables alluding to across-the-board corruption in the state’s political leadership, the Hurriyat (M) broke its silence several days after WikiLeaks quoted top US embassy officials in New Delhi alleging that its chairman, Mirwaiz Umer Farooq, had purchased property in Dubai and Kashmir from pay-offs made by Indian and Pakistani intelligence agencies. Making no mention of the charge, the Hurriyat (M) chose to steer clear of the issue but lashed out at American journalists for former ambassador David Mulford’s purported remarks that Kashmir politics was “as filthy as the Dal Lake.” “Kashmiris will never accept being equated to filth by US journalistic sophistry but will lodge strong protests to convey their views to American journalists who appear to be laboring under supremacist delusions,” a Hurriyat (M) spokesman said, adding that the vocabulary of the disclosures was “painful and unwarranted.” “Comparing Kashmiri politics and leadership to the filth of the Dal Lake smacks of US journalists’ conceit and condescension at the international level,” he said. “The WikiLeaks disclosures about the Hurriyat Conference and other personalities militate against the spirit of journalistic freedom. They appear to be the craft of commercializing a freedom which should have projecting facts in their correct perspective at its core,” he said. “They create an impression that the US government takes decisions on the advice of non-Americans. But the fact is that US diplomats take decisions in their national interest under an established strategy,” he said. “Individuals and groups may have their own opinions, but national decisions are taken by governments, who are then responsible for their fallout,” he said.


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